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New on DVD – November 2, 2010 – Toy Story 3 and Winnebago Man


From the (maybe) concluding episode in Pixar’s groundbreaking blockbuster Toy Story franchise to the surprising true story of the ranting Internet sensation known to most only as the Winnebago Man, here is a well-considered review of the films (good, bad, and otherwise) coming out this week on DVD and Blu-ray.

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According to our critic, Toy Story 3 — in which the lovable and shockingly human toys are now dealing with the possibility of being consigned to the garbage heap now that the once-little Andy is heading off to college — has really just one problem, and it has to do with the glasses needed to watch it in 3-D: “You’ll be removing them regularly to wipe away tears.”

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In the eighties, a Winnebago salesman made a corporate sales video. Only the shoot went horribly, and the result — his profanity-laced and unintentionally hilarious outtakes — turned into a grassroots sensation, first via dubbed VHS tapes and then YouTube clips. Filmmaker Ben Steinbauer decided to first find the Winnebago Man and then figure out what happened to him. The result, our critic said, “is knee-slapping fun, a relentlessly entertaining documentary about fame and the unlikely famous. And the art of cursing.”

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A slacker answers an ad looking for somebody to direct a play called Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Undead, only to find out that the playwright is really a vampire just looking for victims. Perhaps the best vampire comedy ever made in homage to Tom Stoppard and Shakespeare, the film’s “wan” humor (our critic writes)
“pretty much begins and ends with its title.”

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French director François Ozon’s psychological drama centers on a woman who wakes up one morning to find her boyfriend dead of a heroin overdose
and herself pregnant with his baby; later she moves into a remote beach
house and forms a curious bond with her dead boyfriend’s brother. Although he considered the film a “minor” effort from Ozon, our critic thought the director still showed a “bewitching sense of style, denoting an artist transfixed by the darker and more mysterious chambers of the heart.”

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In the newest film from gore-mad genre visionary Neil Marshall (The Descent, Doomsday), a band of Roman legionnaires must battle through enemy territory in
order to get home. Our critic reserved some respect for Marshall’s
all-out gusto but with this film considers him to be the “poor man’s Luc Besson, an impresario of European junk food.”

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David
Lean’s 1957 masterpiece about Allied prisoners forced to build a bridge
for the Japanese during World War II — now available in a fantastically
over-the-top special edition, which also comes in Blu-ray — is a
once-in-a-generation kind of war film. Our writer found its belief in
humanity to be “as fresh and as devastating as it was nearly 50 years
ago.”

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