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Horror Lets Lypsinka Scream for Release… and Attention


lypsinka.jpg“When I was a kid, I loved to go to horror movies to release some tension and also to bring attention to myself by screaming a lot,” says Lypsinka, the alter ego of writer-performer, John Epperson. “Looking back now, I see all of that as a release from Southern small town repression.”

Even if it didn’t begin that way, these days Epperson has a more sincere appreciation of pop culture. “When I moved to New York in 1978, irony and camp were definitely on the upswing,” he recalls. “I went to a wacky club in the East Village to see movies — this was before the predominance of cable TV and home video. Tuesday night was Monster Movie Club, and we saw the tacky horror films we’d all seen as kids in a brand new light — Ed Wood movies like Plan 9 From Outer Space. Fifteen years or so later, Disney made a movie about Ed Wood — and now Club 57 is the subject of a documentary I’m working on.”

Epperson’s recent play My Deah — a retelling of the gory Greek Tragedy Medea that’s set in the Deep South — owes its horrific and comic elements to many over-the-top movies. “Hurry Sundown, a tacky Otto Preminger movie about the South, Hush…Hush, Sweet Charlotte, which is now regarded as a campy horror film, Reflections in a Golden Eye starring Elizabeth Taylor and Marlon Brando, and To Kill a Mockingbird, to name a few.” As for his favorite horror movies, it’s a ten-way-tie.

John Epperson’s Top 10 Horror Movies

Carrie
Blood For Dracula
Flesh For Frankenstein
Horror of Dracula
The Brides of Dracula
Psycho
Rosemary’s Baby
Suspiria
Sisters
The Fury

The Fury is Carrie with a bigger budget,” says Epperson. “It doesn’t bring up the same deep emotional response as Carrie,
but it’s a very good example of style over substance. It’s also very
glamorous. De Palma really gets it right sometimes, like in Sisters and Femme Fatale.”

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