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Mad Men Costume Design 1 - Mad Men Costume DesignMad Men Costume Design 1 - Mad Men Costume Design

Mad Men is set in the Madison Avenue advertising world of 1960. Costume designer Janie Bryant explains here how she and her team put the show’s characters into a fashion time-machine, taking them back into this world.
Photo by Carin Baer

Mad Men Costume Design 2 - Mad Men Costume DesignMad Men Costume Design 2 - Mad Men Costume Design

Designing for Don Draper was a delicate balance. We had to use what was in fashion at the time, but also be on the conservative side. So Don's not wearing a sharkskin suit, and the cut is a little forward for 1960, but the fabrication is very traditional. He has one suit that's a beautiful windowpane, but it's gray, which is the traditional business suit color.
Photo by Carin Baer

Mad Men Costume Design 3 - Mad Men Costume DesignMad Men Costume Design 3 - Mad Men Costume Design

Don also wears a French cuffed shirt and a spread collar which I love. It's classic, beautiful and still very businesslike. But it still has a little pizzazz which makes sense for someone in a creative field as well.
Photo by Carin Baer

Mad Men Costume Design 4 - Mad Men Costume DesignMad Men Costume Design 4 - Mad Men Costume Design

The costume design for Ken, Harry, and Paul was very specifically done. I wanted their looks to be uniform. Their characters are part of a team, the guys in the office, hitting on the girls. They're working it. So I wanted to tie them together with their suits. Their clothing color scheme is a little bit darker than for Don and some of the other characters, and they all have narrow ties except for Harry.
Photo by Carin Baer

Mad Men Costume Design 5 - Mad Men Costume DesignMad Men Costume Design 5 - Mad Men Costume Design

Harry has a bowtie and short sleeves because he's married. I wanted his character to seem more like his wife is shopping for him. His character would also be more into comfort, which is why we went with the short sleeve business shirts.
Photo by Carin Baer

Mad Men Costume Design 6 - Mad Men Costume DesignMad Men Costume Design 6 - Mad Men Costume Design

The year 1960 is a transitional period in women's fashion. The hemlines are becoming shorter as opposed to the earlier fifties style of a circle skirt that has more of a flat front and that is longer and fuller. By 1960, there's a gathering at the waist and the hem length has come up a lot: It's right below the knee and getting shorter.
Photo by Carin Baer

Mad Men Costume Design 7 - Mad Men Costume DesignMad Men Costume Design 7 - Mad Men Costume Design

The jackets are also getting a little more square cut. They're not the Jackie O style yet, with more asymmetrical lines and boxier cuts, but things are definitely heading in that direction.
Photo by Carin Baer

Mad Men Costume Design 8 - Mad Men Costume DesignMad Men Costume Design 8 - Mad Men Costume Design

In designing for the secretaries, we created a definite mix, between the '50s and 1960. It is again a transitional period. Joan has a more forward kind of costume. Her silhouette is more fitted.
Photo by Carin Baer

Mad Men Costume Design 9 - Mad Men Costume DesignMad Men Costume Design 9 - Mad Men Costume Design

On the other end of the spectrum is Peggy, who is more old-fashioned in the cut of her garments. Her clothing has a look of innocence and coming into this world, where she's learning so much and seeing all these things happening with the men and the women in the office. So her costume reflects that.
Photo by Carin Baer

Mad Men Costume Design 10 - Mad Men Costume DesignMad Men Costume Design 10 - Mad Men Costume Design

We don't want to see everybody looking like a model. The interesting thing about the characters in the show is that everybody is beautiful for being different, each looking like individual characters. With all the different body types -- curvy, straight, tall, short -- you can really showcase those elements through the costume design.
Photo by Carin Baer

Costume Designer Janie Bryant shows off the ins and outs of 1960’s corporate couture.
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