Judi Dench, Her Majesty, Mrs. Brown
Rank Title Points Votes Your Vote
1
In 1989, the Best Actress category was a three-way tie between Foster, MacLaine, and Weaver, robbing all three of a clear-cut victory.
Current Score:
28
Total Votes:
82
2
Stone won Best Actress in 1996, beating Susan Sarandon (Dead Man Walking) and Meryl Streep (The Bridges of Madison County).
Current Score:
13
Total Votes:
105
3
No Country for Old Men? There Will Be Blood? Nope. The Globes went with this Keira Knightley period drama instead.
Current Score:
12
Total Votes:
100
4
It's understandable why both the Oscars and Globes lauded Al Pacino for this pic, but its Best Picture win was nonsensical.
Current Score:
6
Total Votes:
94
5
In the first warning sign that Hollywood was going to ignore Titanic, dame Judi Dench upsets Kate Winslet with a turn in a movie no one saw.
Current Score:
6
Total Votes:
84
6
This three-quel scored seven Golden Globe noms, including Best Motion Picture and Director. It lost seven times.
Current Score:
0
Total Votes:
96
7
In one category in particular -- Best Supporting Actress -- Nashville nabbed four of the six possible nominations and still lost the Globe.
Current Score:
-2
Total Votes:
66
8
In 1991, Depardieu prevailed over Johnny Depp (Edward Scissorhands), Richard Gere (Pretty Woman), and Patrick Swayze (Ghost).
Current Score:
-4
Total Votes:
80
9
The movie's win highlighted the Globes' tendency to nominate celebrities (Madonna) so long as they show up for the event.
Current Score:
-7
Total Votes:
79
10
McTeer's turn was adequate, but was she better than Julia Roberts or Reese Witherspoon in Notting Hill or Election, respectively? No.
Current Score:
-14
Total Votes:
68