Edward Andrews

Description   [from Freebase]

Edward Andrews (October 9, 1914 – March 8, 1985) was an American actor, one of the most recognizable character actors on television and films between the 1950s and the 1980s. His stark white hair, portly build and horn-rimmed glasses added to the type of roles he received, as he was often cast as an ornery boss, a cagey businessman, or a strict disciplinarian of some type. He was born in Griffin, Georgia, the son of an Episcopal minister, and grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Cleveland, Ohio and Wheeling, West Virginia. As a child, he attended Pittsburgh's Nixon Theatre and would nab a balcony seat so as to catch a good view of the 'headliners'. At age 12, he did a walk-on in a stock theatre production which featured James Gleason and he was 'hooked' on an acting career. He attended the University of Virginia, and at age 21, made his stage debut in 1935, progressing to Broadway by 1935. During this period, Andrews starred in the short-lived but very well received military drama "So Proudly We Hail" in the lead role opposite Richard Cromwell. In 1936, Andrews debuted in the film Rushin' Art. However, it was not until 1955 that he appeared in his second film.
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